ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Tim Hall » Wed Jan 15, 2014 8:34 pm

Thanks Peter.

Curiosity got the better of me again. Checking the almanacs/slave records, I see the following:

Archibald Campbell appears at "Dunalva" for a few years (1811-1817), then at Ashkenish from 1820-1831 (and posthumously in 1832, though not mentioned as such).
"Alexander et. al." appears at Askenish in 1832, then in 1838 (post-slavery) with 35 "apprentices".

John Allen (possibly my 3rd great-grandfather) appears at Shady Grove from 1822-1829. The 1822 arrival makes sense (his eldest son was born in Scotland, and my great-great-grandmother Sarah Anne was born in Jamaica in 1823 or 1824). The 1829 exit is a bit problematic, as I believe John and Mary returned to Scotland around 1826, but of course he could have continued to own the property for a few more years before selling it (or losing it, or who knows...).

Neil and Amelia Campbell are interesting...

Neil appears at Knapdale (Hanover) in 1817 (very close to his apparent marriage date to Amelia) and continues to be listed there through the end of slavery in 1833.

Amelia suddenly appears in St. Ann Parish (where Endeavour is located) from 1831-1833. (1831 edition was compiled in March 1830, just before Archibald wrote his will).
From this, and the fact that he did not name Neil in his will, only "Mrs. Campbell", I might speculate that they possibly divorced around 1830.

I realize this is a rather flimsy trail of evidence, but it might hold up to additional scrutiny...

Best,
Tim
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Peter Dickson » Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:27 am

But you have been busy!
Neil Campbell had been a partner in the firm of 'Campbell Ruthven & Lindsay' of Glasgow and Jamaica (Dugald Malcolm Ruthven, lived in Trelawny).
When you suggest that Neil and Amelia may have divorced prior to 1830 I would suggest that they were not married. At that time white men in Jamaica did not formally marry 'women of colour' and the term 'Mrs' was used loosely - a wife in all but name. Neil would therefore not have been named formally in Archibald's will as a son-in-law.
I would also suggest that when Archibald described John Allen, in Scotland, as 'now my son-in-law' it meant that John and Sarah were formally married in Scotland (this should be fairly easy to check); there are several instances of mixed race children of white planters marrying in Britain (The daughters of Dugald Campbell of Salt Spring, Hanover - he referred to their mother as 'Mrs Johnson'; the daughter of John Tharp of Trelawny who married a Cambridgeshire landowner and more).

The name Askinish appears the year after the name Dunalva disappears - they were one and the same properties, renamed in 1817.
Peter
P.S. There was also an Endeavour in Hanover
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Peter Dickson » Wed Jan 29, 2014 5:18 pm

Dear Tim,

I found this at the Scotland's People website (I had some credits left over):
“Keith, 24 August 1829, John Allan in Keith was married to Mary Campbell eldest daughter of Archd. Campbell Esqr. of Askinish, Hanover, Jamaica, without proclamation” [Scotland, OPR Marriages 159/00 0050 0845 Keith]
Peter
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Tim Hall » Wed Jan 29, 2014 8:21 pm

Thanks very much, Peter. This is very, very interesting. Holding this up alongside the other records, it looks like the marriage was "recorded" upon John's return to Scotland in 1829. That leaves me with a few mysteries... (or some slight reinforcement of my flimsy trail of evidence, depending on how you look at it!):

1. Is Archibald Campbell Allan's implied birth year from the 1841 census (1818 or 1819) correct, and was he born in Scotland or Jamaica? It seems more likely to me that Mary grew up in Jamaica and did not live in Scotland prior to John's arrival in Jamaica, thus she would have arrived in Scotland for the first time with John in 1829 (and was probably urgently interested in recording their marriage with the local church as soon as possible). I would speculate that John met Mary in Jamaica no later than 1821, probably a few years earlier (prior to his first appearance in the Almanacs), and their first son Archibald Campbell Allan was born there soon after, perhaps as early as the census implies, or perhaps as late as 1822. Perhaps the census is correct, because we also need to squeeze Mary E's birth into the early 1820s as well.
2. Was son John Allan, born 1826 or 1827 per the 1841 census (if I recall correctly) born in Jamaica or Scotland? It sure seems like he was either born in Jamaica, or he was not their natural son. At this point I would bet he was their natural son, and was born in Jamaica, where birth records are a bit more sketchy and christenings were performed more sporadically. Perhaps only the 2 daughters got christened in Jamaica (perhaps at Mary's insistence), and the 2 eldest sons (and daughter Mary E) did not? In any case, we seem to have more reliable birth/christening records for the children who were born after the family moved to Scotland... so in a flimsy sort of way, it all points in roughly the same direction.

I obviously haven't proven much of anything, but the picture seems a little clearer with each new fact that turns up...

Thanks again!
Tim
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Peter Dickson » Wed Jan 29, 2014 8:46 pm

Tim,
Have you examined actual census images for 1841 and 1851? Place of birth, in the England & Wales census was certainly recorded, but I don't know if it was so in Scotland.
In 1841, the letter N meant the individual was not born in the same county where the census was taken.
In 1851, the actual country was named and if a British territory it was followed by B.S. to denote 'British Subject' This would confirm where Archibald Campbell Allan and John Allan the younger were born. My guess would be Jamaica.
Peter
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Tim Hall » Tue Feb 04, 2014 5:19 am

Hi Peter,

I haven't had much luck in that regard. The 1841 census record listed everyone as being born in Scotland. As far as the 1851 census goes, Archibald Campbell Allan was already dead. I do see potential matches for John in 1851 and 1861:

Possible match in 1851 census for Paisley Middle Church, Renfrewshire: John Allan, lodger, Clerk, 23, b. Jamaica

Possible match in the 1861 census for Keith, Banffshire: John Allan,35, Earls Mill, Labourer, b. Keith, Banffshire.

Unfortunately I don't see an obvious match for John in the SRI death records. I wonder if he emigrated somewhere else after 1861?

Tim
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Malcolm419 » Tue Feb 18, 2014 12:43 am

Like Peter, my interests are in the early history of the Campbells and several other Scottish settler families in Jamaica. I found this thread very interesting indeed - I too have been stymied in trying to figure out the identity of Archibald Campbell of Asknish, despite the clues that Peter referred to earlier. I've reviewed the testaments of both Robert Campbell of Asknish, Scotland (d. 1810) and his brother, Duncan Campbell, supervisor of excise for Glasgow, who died in 1797. The only Jamaican reference in either is in Duncan's, where he is party to several bonds made in Jamaica in 1793 by a Lieut. Colin Campbell of the Latina - presumably a vessel, and possibly connected to the Campbell, Ruthven & Lindsay merchant operation, who I believe employed a Colin Campbell as captain on merchant ships sailing between Greenock and Jamaica. Robert Campbell of Asknish also had brothers Archibald (b. 1727, so too old to be the Jamaican Archibald), Angus, Alexander and James, and sisters Susannah and Isabel who each married Campbells, so one would think there would be ample opportunity for Robert to have a nephew who would fit, but no such person has appeared so far. I still haven't accessed the wills of Sir Humphry Trafford Campbell or his widow, which are available on the UK National Archives website; I've noticed that some of the PCC wills seem to be showing up on ancestry.com, so hopefully they'll soon be available from that source.

There are a couple of other Jamaican connections which might conceivably be relevant - Robert Campbell of Asknish acquired in 1768 Lochgair House which had been the seat of the baronets of Auchinbreck. The then baronet, Sir James Campbell (d. 1814), appears to have been in Jamaica or the West Indies into the 1760's, serving in the 49th Regiment of Foot which was originally raised in Jamaica in 1745. What his other activities might have been remains obscure. In 1793, Robert of Asknish acquired the additional estates of Duchernan and Craigmurrell from another Jamaica resident and relative of the Auchinbreck family, Duncan Campbell, styled of Duchernan, who apparently died in or around Lucea in 1800. Robert's marriage to a grandaughter of Sir Humphrey Trafford, which presumably introduced Trafford as a Christian name to this branch of the Campbells, was in 1769.

Finally, to go back to the original Allen subject matter - does anyone know if the Allens/Allans from whom Tim is descended are connected to John Allen/Allan of Errol, a Jamaica attorney who returned to Scotland around 1780 with great wealth and acquired an estate in Perthshire? There is also a James Hardie Allan, born 1854 in Fintray, Aberdeenshire, who appears as an estate manager in St. Anns parish, Jamaica in the 1870's. According to his descendants' family tree on ancestry.com (which I haven't checked), this James had a brother named Archibald Campbell Allan, born 1871 in St. Combs, Aberdeenshire. Any connection? Both James Hardie and Archibald Campbell Allan end up in the Western US - Colorado and New Mexico respectively.

Hope this is of interest, and that some of these rather random jigsaw pieces might fit with other information in your possession, and help answer some of the remaining open questions.

Malcolm
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Tim Hall » Tue Feb 18, 2014 4:16 am

Thanks Malcolm. This is certainly interesting. All of those similar names (especially the more "distinctive" names like Trafford Campbell and Archibald Campbell Allan), and the references to Ask(i)nish, sure seem to be trying to tell us something. It seems like we're just one or two pieces of information away from a breakthrough. Thanks for adding this information - Tim
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Peter Dickson » Wed Feb 19, 2014 8:49 pm

Malcolm,

Most interesting post. It surprises me that Archibald Campbell of Askinish [1752-1830] is so elusive as there don't seem to have been many by that name in Jamaica, certainly not from the 18 century who lived for so long. Two questions come to mind:
    Was Archibald born in Jamaica?
    If not, when did he arrive?

I guess the process towards this answer is one of elimination as well as possibility...

I have eliminated one Archibald who was a nephew of James Campbell of Duan Vale & Gibraltar (in St. James but latterly in Trelawny) [d.1766] as being too young.
There is reference to a partnership of Alexander & Archibald Campbell at Lucea in 1781. The one Alexander in Hanover at that time was in partnership with his brother-in-law, John Tharp (later of The Good Hope, Trelawny) in the business of slaving, although this does not exclude Archibald as a possibility – he would have been 29

David Dobson, in his publications 'Scots in the West Indies' and 'Scottish Settlers in North America, records the following:
    Campbell, Archibald, a merchant in Kingston, 1788 [NAS, RS Glasgow, 1045/1050]
    Campbell, Archibald, eldest son of Ronald Campbell, a merchant in Campbeltown later in Jamaica and Jean his wife, emigrated to the West Indies in 1790 [Argyll Sheriff Book, XIX, 12.5]

On Robert Campbell of Asknish, I have only only one reference to him by a Jamaican Campbell. John of Orange Bay, in an 1806 letter to John of Kilberry (son of Archibald of Knockbuie & of Minard in St. Ann) mentions 'Asknish' being in poor health at Lochgair.

There was another link between Robert of Asknish and Campbells in Jamaica – the lands of Duchernan & Craigmunel. These properties appear to have changed hands several times between 1770 and 1807.

In 1770, Duncan Campbell of Duchernan [d. 1800 in Hanover] conveyed them to his cousin John Campbell of Salt Spring [David Dobson, Scots in the West Indies, NA, RD2 215.143]. After Salt Spring's death in 1782, they presumably reverted to Duncan if he then conveyed them to Robert of Asknish in 1793.

By 1807, Duchernan belonged to John Campbell of Orange Bay [d.1808] whose properties in Jamaica and Scotland passed to his nephew, John Williams Blagrove. By 1817, JW Blagrove was 'in a deranged state of mind' and could not defend a suit at the Court of Session in Edinburgh in which ownership of the lands was at stake. Jamaicans John Blagrove the elder (his father) and Peter Campbell II of Fish River defended the claim.

Unfortunately, none of the Jamaican Campbells in Hanover (Orange Bay, Fish River, Salt Spring) mentions a relevant Archibald in surviving letters and wills that I have seen.

On Allen/Allan in the 18th century, there was a family by that name at Tryall in Hanover, first as lessees then as owners of the estate, but they appear to have had connections with London and Kent rather than with Scotland.

Peter
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Tim Hall » Tue Jul 08, 2014 4:16 pm

Hello,

I've received the results of my ancestry.com DNA test. They indicate that 1% of my "markers" trace back to Senegal, which would be reasonably consistent with having 1 African 5th great-grandparent. One of my Hay cousins has just volunteered to take the test, so if she also comes back with roughly 1% from Senegal that would at least be supportive of the theory that my African roots are on the Hay(/Falconer/Allan/Campbell) side.

Regards
Tim Hall
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Peter Dickson » Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:18 pm

Hi Tim,
Late reply I'm afraid. Fascinating stuff, which all adds up from your point of view. Would be most interested to hear of further familial results.
Peter
P.S. my late father's DNA analysis showed up a Taino marker.
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby amjecampbell » Mon Dec 22, 2014 10:03 am

Hi

My name is Angus Campbell and I am descended from the MacIvers of Asknish. I have been studying the family history for 5 years and did not come across any connection to Jamaica - until now!

I am heading out the door to visit my daughter for Christmas but on my return I will post some information which may help with your research.

Merry Christmas

Angus
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Re: ALLEN - Jamaica, Hanover

Postby Tim Hall » Mon Dec 22, 2014 4:31 pm

Thank you Angus! Have a merry Christmas and I look forward to your information.

Peter, my DNA test update is a little confusing... My 2nd cousin took the ancestry.com DNA test, and although the lab had no trouble figuring out that we were approximately 2nd cousins of each other, her results showed no measurable trace of Senegalese DNA. (We have another 2nd cousin on that side ready to take the test. My results showed an expected range of 0-1% so it's still somewhat possible that the African connection is on this side and my cousin doesn't have enough of it to "register"). I'm trying to see if I can eliminate my other 3 grandparents' sides of the family as the source of my African roots. Of those, there is one side where I already have enough 3rd cousins who have taken the test to eliminate that side as the source, one side where I can probably get someone to take the test soon, and one side where the logistics will prove rather difficult. So I may ultimately be out of luck when it comes to "proving" anything.

Merry Christmas all (including our list administrator for providing this excellent forum) - Regards, Tim
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