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Events that shaped the Caribbean .

PostPosted: Thu May 15, 2008 7:22 pm
by Miles Hispaniae
The English transported about 1,900,000 slaves to their colonies in the Caribbean from the years 1651 to 1807 when they finally abolished the slave trade.

The French, whose trade lasted between 1664 and 1830, shipped about 1,650,000 to their colonies.

In roughly the same period, the Dutch took 900,000 to the Guianas and the West Indies.

Of course, these figures do not include those who died on the sea voyage and those who were killed by slave hunters in the gathering process in Africa.

The Dutch West India Company came into being in 1621. The
Dutch took control of a part of Brazil in the year 1637 but lost it again in 1645. They retained one fortress in Brazil until 1654. Another attempt by the company was to take the El Moro fort of Puerto Rico in 1625. However, after a five-week siege of San Juan, the Dutch could not take the fort.

The Danish (Danes) , created their own West Indies Company in 1671.

The Dutch occupied Tobago in the early 1630s.

The Spaniards took over St. Croix, but the French drove them out in 1650.

In the middle of the 17th century the Dutch dominated trade with over 25,000 ships.

The Danes on St. Thomas occupied nearby St. John in 1716, and the French sold St. Croix to the Danes in 1733.

Governor Thomas Lynch (1670-74) tried to decrease piracy in Jamaica, and the Assembly prescribed at least one European for every eight Africans. Buccaneers got only 100,000 pieces of eight from Trinidad in 1673.

In 1777 the Island of Grenada had 27 slaves per European.

The population of the British West Indies in 1787 was
1. 461,864 African slaves
2. 58,353 Europeans, and 7,706 free Africans.

The population of the French West Indies in 1780 was
1. 437,738 African slaves
2. 63,682 Europeans, and 13,429 free Africans.

Between 1791 and 1805 Havana, Cuba received over 91,000 slaves.

St. Domingue imported over 800,000 African slaves between 1680 and 1776.

In 1791 St. Domingue had 7,466 plantations-

792 in sugar
2,180 in coffee
705 in cotton
3,097 in indigo
69 in cocoa


The census of 1774 recorded that 5,000 of the 7,000 female affranchis were the mistresses of Europeans.

St. Croix were the Dutch and English with a small number of French Protestants. The Spaniards, in Puerto Rico, were concerned by the growth of the English and Dutch. In a surprise attack the Spanish landed on St. Croix and killed many settlers and forced the others to leave. The French heard of the overthrow of the English and took the opportunity to move in themselves and take over St. Croix from the Spanish. In 1650. Philippe de Poincy, an official of the Knights of Malta, sent 160 of his best troops to capture St. Croix. He succeeded and then quickly sent some three hundred planters from St. Kitts to establish settlements on the newly captured colony. In June 13,1733 the Danish West Indies Company bought the island from France. The Danish West Indian Company wasted no time in sending settlers to St. Croix to form their new colony.

Puerto Rico required that appealed of Irish planters and skilled craftsmen residing in the nearby British and Danish colonies.

In 1766, he proposed setting up an Irish colony of one hundred well-to-do families in Puerto Rico. He asked for authorisation to bring in provisions, tools and slaves not just for his settlers, but also to supply Puerto Rico and other Spanish American colonies

Lieutenant Colonel Arturo O’Neill, also of Hibernia, co-led the final assault that dislodged the British forces. For his feat, Spain named him Governor of West Florida and subsequently appointed him to the Supreme Council of War . His two nephews, Tulio O'Neill O'Keffe and Arturo O’Neill O'Keffe, born in Saint Croix in 1780's, moved to Puerto Rico with their slaves and plantation equipment with another Irish planter residing in Saint Croix, Tomás Armstrong .